Peer Feedback and Response

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This week we were required to share our blog with two other students and assess their blogs using afeedback tech learning marking rubric. The idea was to receive and provide some constructive feedback to assist with final submission of the blog assignment. Assessment that takes place during a task (as opposed to after) by providing both positive and constructive feedback instils confidence and motivation within the learner and allows them to use the feedback immediately to improve their understanding and achievement of learning outcomes (McMillan, 2011).

The feedback I received from Katherine Tindale and Aimee Butler proved to be motivating and productive. They both began with positive comments stating that they found my blog visually appealing, informative and relevant. Katherine drew my attention to one of the links not working which was a simple error I could promptly correct; along with a suggestion to edit my writing and punctuation to ensure the sentences were cohesive to the reader. Aimee mentioned that I may need to check the in-text references to ensure I have not missed any important citations. I agreed with the comments from Katherine and Aimee and edited the blog from a reader’s perspective, adding some new references and re-wording some sentences.

Peer Marking_Rubric from Katherine Tindale

Peer Marking Rubric from Aimee Butler


References

McMillan, J.H. (2011). Classroom Assessment. Boston: Pearson Education.

Lesson Plan

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piktochart logo

This week I generated a lesson plan incorporating the digital technology, Piktochart for creating infographics. The lesson, Australia’s Neighbours, is based on Year Level Three content of The Australian Curriculum (ACARA, 2014) and is to be conducted over two parts in consideration of appropriate lesson length to maintain engagement for the age of the students.

lesson plan preview

Lesson Plan: ‘Australia’s Neighbours’


 

References

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), (2014). The Australian Curriculum. Retrieved May 15, 2014, from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Year3

 

Schooling in the Digital Age [week 9]

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This week was a very insightful topic and I was particularly inspired by Ken Robinson’s (2006) presentation on the importance of creativity in education. The Australian Curriculum (ACARA, 2014) is reflecting this view, with much progression and development of The Arts learninken robinsong areas with strong links to the Technology learning areas- signifying a digital age of schooling and national interest to embrace creativity in education. As teachers, it is important to support each individual child’s strengths and interests, building their knowledge and skills from this foundation (Marsh, 2010). Digital technology can be a valuable tool, especially in terms of accessing, sharing and presenting ideas and information (Howell, 2012).

 

Here is the Prezi I created to summarise the key points of Robinson’s (2006) talk:

prezi screenshot


References

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), (2014).The Australian Curriculum. Retrieved May 9, 2014, from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/.
Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT: Digital Pedagogies for Collaboration and Creativity. South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming A Teacher: Skills, Knowledge and Issues (5th ed.). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Australia.
Robinson, K. (2006). How Schools Kill Creativity. TED Talks, TED Conferences, LLC. Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/playlists/24/re_imagining_school

 

Lifelong Learning and Global Citizenship [week 8]

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An important role of being a teacher in a digital world is contributing to student lifelong learning and an involvement and awareness as global citizens of the world. This means educating students with skills and behaviours which they can continue to use to expand their learning throughout their lifetime (Howell, 2012). Digital technology is a vital learning tool that can assist students to research and learn about global issues and their responsibilities as local, national and global citizens (LLCQ, 2013).

This week I researched The Earth Day Network, an organisation concerned with environmenearth day networktal and health issues, responsibilities and education. They aim to assist in securing a safe and healthy future for the planet and its people. Their Green Schools campaign is of particular relevance to teachers as they promote the improvement of environmental education for schools. The website (http://edu.earthday.org/about/what-is-a-green-school) contains useful resources for teachers, including a blog, library and a facility to seek advice from experts in the field. This is one of many resources available to teachers to encourage active global citizenship amongst future students.


 

References

Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT: Digital Pedagogies for Collaboration and Creativity. South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
Lifelong Learning Council Queensland Inc, (LLCQ), (2013). What is Lifelong Learning? Retrieved from http://www.llcq.org.au/01_cms/details.asp?ID=12

 

Earth Day Network – http://www.earthday.org

Inspired by the World of Gaming [week 7]

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I have always viewed gaming in general as counter-productive and antisocial. However, I have been immensely inspired by Jane McGonigal’s Ted Talks presentation, ‘Gaming can make a better world’(2010), on using the popularity of gaming to educate, solve and build awareness of global issues. Her aim to use this “powerful platform for change” to solve real-world problems (McGonigal, 2010), is perhaps finding gamingproductivity out of something that is not so productive within the boundaries of a virtual world . It is using gamers’ abilities and skills positively through more authentic, meaningful games and education.

The role of a teacher is exactly the same – creating meaningful educational experiences using student interests as motivation (Marsh, 2010) . Students’ recreational activities in a digital world are widespread, if teachers can merge learning content with interests such as games, they will be providing digitally rich and relevant educational experiences (Howell, 2012).

After creating and playing a game using Sploder this week (see picture link below for game), I have compiled list of possible benefits and components of game making or playing for teaching and learning purposes:
• Problem solving
• Creativity
• Sense of achievement
• Physical fine-motor and hand-eye co-ordination
• Individual or small group activity
• Wide range of digital skills – depending on game or website being used
• Freedom to include a wide range of learning content and concepts

sploder game screenshot


 

References

Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT: Digital Pedagogies for Collaboration and Creativity. South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming A Teacher: Skills, Knowledge and Issues (5th ed.). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Australia.
McGonigal. J. (2010). Gaming can make a better world . TED Talks, TED Conferences, LLC. Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/talks/jane_mcgonigal_gaming_can_make_a_better_world

 

Digital Fluency [week 6]

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This week covered many ways to acquire skills through engagement in interesting and fun technologies. The weekly reading chapter, Developing Digital Fluency in Learners (Howell, 2012) is an insightful guide for a variety of technologies, skills and lesson ideas to be used in a primary school setting. Below is an image summarising the types of technologies addressed in the chapter which can be used to build digital proficiency in young learners (Howell, 2012).

technology for primary schools

 

The weekly task required the creation of a Scratch animation. Scratch is a website which can be used to make simple to more advanced cartoons, games and interactive activities. Although much trial, error and time was spent to understand and learn the program, I achieved great satisfaction of my creation. There are clear possible benefits to using Scratch or similar programs in a primary classroom environment.

Animations are a fun and creative way to display information or data. Therefore, this kind scratch logoof technology would be suited to a range of learning areas and individual or social learning in pairs (ACARA, 2014). Students can enhance their digital learning by combining and collaborating ideas and experiencing a range of interesting and challenging technologies (Howell, 2012).

Here is a link to the Scratch animation I created – Girl chasing cat chasing dog.


 

References

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), (2014).The Australian Curriculum. Retrieved March 9, 2014, from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/.
Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT: Digital Pedagogies for Collaboration and Creativity. South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

Digital Information [week5]

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Information in the digital world is astoundingly vast. The many formats, archives and media available for teachers or students to use in teaching and learning can be daunting (Marsh, 2010) as there are so many to choose from. Furthermore, searching for information can be time consuming and frustrating if the searcher lacks effective web searching skills (Howell, 2012). Because there are so many categories and levels of information available on the internet – ranging from light-hearted images and captions to the more credible, academic forums – it is important for teachers to develop an understanding about digital information and how to effectively use the resources available to them in a digital world (Howell, 2012).

Pinterest is a virtual pin up board which can be used in various ways to collect and share information with others and an example of how efficient and accessible digital information can be. I have uspinterest speech bubblesed Pinterest before, but only for recreational use such as hairstyles or recipes. This week I explored the world of teaching resources through Pinterest and created a board for this unit of study (click on the picture below to view). I find it quite enjoyable and so fast to collect information – if I see something of interest or relevance, I can pin it and come back to it as I please. This is a valuable and engaging teaching and learning resource which I will continue to use for my future studies and teaching.

pinterest screen shot

 


References

Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT: Digital Pedagogies for Collaboration and Creativity. South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming A Teacher: Skills, Knowledge and Issues (5th ed.). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Australia.